Friday

Assignments


[Henri Silberman: Central Park (1961)]

Assessment

This is a 15 credit paper, 100 % internally assessed. This is how the marks are divided up:

The Fiction Portfolio: 35 %
consisting of
  • 1 New Story: 10 percent
  • 1 Revised Class Story: 15 percent
  • 2 Completed Class Exercises: 10 percent

The Poetry Portfolio: 35 %
consisting of
  • 1 New Poem: 10 percent
  • 1 Revised Class Poem: 15 percent
  • 2 Completed Class Exercises: 10 percent

Craft Essay: 10 %

Peer Reviews: 10 %

Participation: 10 %

= 100 %


NB: Both the fiction and poetry portfolios are compulsory parts of the assessment. You must have them accepted for grading in order to be eligible to pass the course.

You are also required to have attended sufficient classes throughout the semester to receive a participation grade from your tutor.

The two in-class peer reviews and the craft essay are, however, not compulsory. If you miss any of them you will simply lose the grades for that assignment.


Your portfolio must include the following components:

  1. New story

  2. This is a completely new story written as a response to everything you’ve learnt in the course to date.

    It can be, but does not have to be based on one of the fiction exercises in the course. As with your class story, you may not base it on an exercise included elsewhere in your portfolio.

    [A note on length: Both of the stories you submit should be between 1,000 and 2,000 words long. Don’t go beyond that length unless you have received permission from your tutor or you will lose marks.]

  3. Revision of class story

  4. This is a revision of the story you originally copied and distributed to your tutorial group. Be sure to attach the marked copy handed back to you by your tutor to the text of the new version. If you fail to do so, your story will automatically have half the possible number of marks deducted.

    You don’t have to have followed the suggestions and feedback offered to you by your classmates or tutor but you should show evidence of having at least considered them ((but the word limit is still only 1,000-2,000 words long).

    [A note on revision: Changing a few words and some punctuation does not constitute substantial revision. Re-vision your original idea – make it new. This is a rewrite rather than a light edit. If you submit more or less the same story discussed in class, your tutor has already given you an indication of the grade it will probably receive.]

  5. Two completed exercises

  6. These could be any of the four Fiction Exercises started in class and completed at home. In this section of the portfolio you must follow the exercise instructions precisely. You may not include any exercise which you’ve used as the basis for either of your two short stories (1. and 2. above).

    [A note on length: The two exercises you submit should be only between a paragraph and a page long, as specified in the rubric for each. Don’t go beyond that length. Please be careful to indicate which exercises you've done.]


Your portfolio must include the following components:

  1. New poem

  2. This is an entirely new poem inspired either by one of the poems in the anthology, or written independently, or written as a response to one of the exercises (though – as with the class poem – this cannot be based on an exercise included elsewhere in your portfolio).

    [A note on length: Each of the poems and poetry exercises you submit for grading in this course should be at least 14 lines long, with the sole exception of haiku. If you include haiku in your portfolio, either as a poem or an exercise, you must provide at least three of them (either linked, or as three individual three-line poems).]

  3. Revision of class poem

  4. Be careful to attach the original marked copy of the poem handed back to you by your tutor. If you fail to do so, your poem will automatically have five marks deducted.

    You don’t have to have followed the suggestions and feedback offered to you by your classmates or tutor but you should show evidence of having at least considered them (again, the poem needs to be at least 14 lines long).

    [A note on revision: Changing a few words and some punctuation does not constitute substantial revision. Re-vision your original idea – make it new. This is a rewrite rather than a light edit. If you submit more or less the same poem you already read in class, your tutor has already given you an indication of the grade it will probably receive.]

  5. Two completed exercises

  6. These could be any two of the five Poetry Exercises started in class. You don’t need to attach your drafts and working notes – just a complete version of each exercise. In this section of the portfolio you must follow the exercise instructions precisely. Please also indicate which exercise it is that you've done.

    You may not include any exercise which you’ve used as the basis for one of your two poems (1. and 2. above).


This essay is due in at the same time as your final portfolio, on Friday of the first week of study break.

In no more than 500 words, you should discuss the process you went through in writing either one of the two short stories or one of the two poems you submitted in one of your two writing portfolios (NB: You may not discuss any of the class exercises included in either portfolio).

You must also make close reference to the story or poem in the Book of Readings that yours was based on. Your choice of story or poem to discuss in this essay will therefore be limited by the fact that the one you choose has to have been prompted in some way by one of the readings in the Course Anthology.

It is important that you give equal importance to both parts of this assignment. If you fail to discuss in detail either your own piece of writing or the one from the Book of Readings, you can expect to be marked out of 5 rather than 10 %.


Each person will get a turn at reviewing someone else’s work twice in the semester.

How should you go about preparing for this review? Well, start off by making some notes about the poem and story in question:
  • Is the overall point of it clear to you?
  • What is that overall point?
  • Are there any details you particularly liked / disliked?
  • Why?
  • Did you enjoy reading it?
  • Why / why not?
  • What are some specific ways the author might go about improving it?
  • Finally, are there any direct questions you would like to ask the author?

You will be assessed on how well you lead a discussion on this poem/ story, not just on the content of your notes, so come prepared to speak, not just to read out details from a piece of paper …


One half of this grade will be allotted according to how constructively and consistently you have taken part in class discussions and activities during the semester.

There are no marks for attendance as such, since you are expected to be at every session.

There will, however, be a simple one-question quiz about that week’s readings at each workshop which will count for half a mark each (x 10 = 5 marks).

There will be a lot of demands made on your organizational abilities in this course. Think ahead, and always come prepared.


No comments: